CVI salient features books

CVI salient features books
CVI salient features books

When my son who has cortical visual impairment (CVI) was in preschool, it was important that he had visually accessible books. Most of the books in his classroom were filled with bright, multicolored, visually complex illustrations (complexity, Roman). Bright Baby makes a series of books that uses realistic photographic images and plain, solid color backgrounds. The books are inexpensive, easy to modify, and are one of the few items that CVI parents do not have to make themselves from scratch. Continue reading “CVI salient features books”

ModMath app for kids with writing issues

ModMath app for kids with writing issues
ModMath app for kids with writing issues

ModMath is a math app that was created by parents, to help their child who has a learning disability and difficulty with handwriting. The free app “provides students a pencil free platform for doing basic arithmetic” equations including addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Many of our kids with cortical visual impairment (CVI) also have difficulty with fine motor tasks like handwriting. ModMath could be a good option for students with CVI. A bonus would be the ability to color code math equations. The verdict is still out on that, but the question has been proposed.

Husband-and-Wife Team Create Free Math App for Kids With Writing Issues

CVI-TVI Survey

A group of teachers of the visually impaired (TVI) have created a survey, link below, to find out how colleagues learn about cortical visual impairment (CVI). If you are a TVI, please complete the survey and share with your networks.

We are fellow Teachers of the Visually Impaired who are working with collaborators in a study group to investigate Cortical/Cerebral Vision Impairment (CVI). We are interested in learning more about how our colleagues across the US are gaining knowledge about CVI and how comfortable they feel about addressing this visual condition.

Matt Tietjen and Peg Palmer are TVIs working for BESB (Bureau of Education and Services for the Blind) in Connecticut.

Ellen Mazel is the CVI Program Manager at the Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Massachusetts and author of the blog “CVI Teacher.”

We guarantee that we will not use or share any of your personal information, your job or your personal circumstances. All responses will be completely anonymous.

Thanks for your help on this. We really appreciate the time you will take to fill out the following questions.

CVI-TVI Survey

Start Seeing CVI at NIH

Thank you to CVI mom Rachel for sharing your photo and wearing your t-shirt and raising awareness of cortical visual impairment (CVI). Every time you wear your t-shirt, or tell someone “My child has cortical visual impairment” or explain CVI to the 1,000th person who says “I have never heard of that,” you help to raise awareness of CVI.

From Rachel:

image1“At our yearly visit to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This time they heard all about cortical visual impairment (CVI)—the leading cause of visual impairment in children in the U.S. The medical and educational fields have been slow to respond to kids with cortical visual impairment and CVI moms from across the country are joining together to change this. Here’s to the year of being a CVI tiger mom.”

Rachel shared that this was Henry’s fourth annual visit to NIH. After she provided Henry’s CVI Range Assessment report, the doctors referred to CVI as “central visual impairment” in the discussion that followed.

Share your Start Seeing CVI t-shirt photos on our Facebook page or email your photo and story to StartSeeingCVI@gmail.com.

CVI critical mass and advocacy

CVI critical mass and advocacy
CVI critical mass and advocacy

My son is visually impaired. Learning to say those words was hard. These days I am more likely to say, My son has a cortical visual impairment (CVI). CVI is a brain based visual impairment that interferes with the ability to make sense of what you are looking at. Visually impaired is an inadequate description of my son’s vision. In seven years I have learned that most of the time, when we say blind or visually impaired, we are not talking about my son who has CVI, or about children who have CVI. When we say visually impaired, we are talking about someone with an ocular impairment, which has to do with the structure of the eye. Most everything that goes along with serving a student with an ocular impairment – accommodations, Braille, early learning, education, the Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC), orientation and mobility (O&M), schools for the blind, teachers of the visually impaired (TVI), university vision teacher preparation programs – has almost nothing to do with a child who has CVI. Continue reading “CVI critical mass and advocacy”