CVI literacy, adapting books and text

* Guest blog post by Judy Endicott

When helping my grandson, River, who is almost nine, I know it is critical to use his CVI Range score (Roman-Lantzy), late Phase II, and information about his CVI characteristics as my guide to modifying his literacy materials. I always remind myself that what I can see and understand is different from what River “sees” and understands. Continue reading “CVI literacy, adapting books and text”

Literacy materials for Phase II and Phase III CVI

* Guest blog post by Judy Endicott

I am in awe of the families who belong to the community of cortical visual impairment (CVI) learners, of Christine Roman-Lantzy and all the others who have taught me about CVI. Everyone’s journey into the world of CVI has been different, but our common quest for knowledge has created a powerful force for change. Thank you all for your sharing your knowledge! Continue reading “Literacy materials for Phase II and Phase III CVI”

CVI salient features books

CVI salient features books
CVI salient features books

When my son who has cortical visual impairment (CVI) was in preschool, it was important that he had visually accessible books. Most of the books in his classroom were filled with bright, multicolored, visually complex illustrations (complexity, Roman). Bright Baby makes a series of books that uses realistic photographic images and plain, solid color backgrounds. The books are inexpensive, easy to modify, and are one of the few items that CVI parents do not have to make themselves from scratch. Continue reading “CVI salient features books”

So to speak

Continue reading “So to speak”

Learning to smile

Learning to smile
Learning to smile

As parents of children who have cortical visual impairment (CVI), every day we experience their difficulty with the visual complexity of the human face (complexity, distance, latency, movement; Roman). Our kids struggle to look at our faces, to make eye contact with us, to read our facial expressions. They struggle to visually recognize us as their parents. Cortical visual impairment means they miss facial expressions such as boredom, confusion, frustration, sadness, worry. CVI means they also miss seeing the happiness, joy, pride, and love that it is written on a parent’s face.

What follows is the story of Emma, who learned to smile with her mom, Lynn. Continue reading “Learning to smile”