Seeing CVI at school

Seeing CVI at school
Seeing CVI at school

Yesterday was a Monday, from start to finish. You know everything is going to be  extra challenging when you drop off your child with cortical visual impairment (CVI) at school and learn that his paraprofessional is out that day. We all have our emergencies, and it was her turn. Children with CVI rely on predictability and routine, especially when it comes to their people. A day of multiple transitions is not an easy prospect. It turned out that the unexpected day provided an unexpected opportunity for his teacher to see my son’s CVI. Continue reading “Seeing CVI at school”

“Considerations for CVI and Social Inclusion” by Christine Roman (webinar)

"Considerations for CVI and Social Inclusion"
“Considerations for CVI and Social Inclusion”

When it comes to explaining cortical visual impairment (CVI), nobody does it better than Christine Roman-Lantzy. She could be described thus: She literally wrote the book on cortical visual impairment. Or you could say, “books.” In Perkins’ series “CVI for the TVI and other professionals” Dr Roman talks at length about the impact of CVI on the social development and social inclusion of children with CVI. You can find the link to Considerations for CVI and Social Inclusion, parts I and II, below. Continue reading ““Considerations for CVI and Social Inclusion” by Christine Roman (webinar)”

How do you greet a child with CVI?

How do you greet a child with CVI?
How do you greet a child with CVI?

We know that one of the ten characteristics of cortical visual impairment (CVI) is difficulty with faces, a component of Complexity (Roman-Lantzy). Knowing this, we should take some time to consider how we greet and interact with a child with CVI, remembering he is not likely to recognize you. This is essential for school teams, especially at the beginning of the school year. With a swirl of new peers, teachers, and classes, how we greet kids with CVI is so important. Continue reading “How do you greet a child with CVI?”

“Guess Who?” game in Phase III CVI

IMG_9685This one is just for fun, because kids with CVI like to have fun. We can play a game and approach it from the perspective of cortical visual impairment (CVI). A good friend recently gave Jasper a game called “Guess Who?” My worry was that it was about recognizing facial expressions. Turns out it is more about recognizing visual details than expressions. And turns out that my son adores this game. Continue reading ““Guess Who?” game in Phase III CVI”

Learning to smile

Learning to smile
Learning to smile

As parents of children who have cortical visual impairment (CVI), every day we experience their difficulty with the visual complexity of the human face (complexity, distance, latency, movement; Roman). Our kids struggle to look at our faces, to make eye contact with us, to read our facial expressions. They struggle to visually recognize us as their parents. Cortical visual impairment means they miss facial expressions such as boredom, confusion, frustration, sadness, worry. CVI means they also miss seeing the happiness, joy, pride, and love that it is written on a parent’s face.

What follows is the story of Emma, who learned to smile with her mom, Lynn. Continue reading “Learning to smile”