At the store with my child who has CVI

At the store with my child who has CVI
At the store with my child who has CVI

“You guys sure go to the store a lot!” Last week was all about parent teacher conferences, and both the classroom teacher and resource room teacher made the same comment. It is true that my son enjoys going to stores, especially food shopping. It is also true that we do many other things, like hikes, walks, the beach, riding bikes – in addition to a never ending schedule of medical and therapy appointments. But our outside excursions are not the activities that make their way back to the classroom. My suspicion is that his focus on stores and places has more to do with getting to know a novel community, and the lay of the land, along with the social experience of it all. That both teachers commented  made me think of all the things you can do at the store, when your child has cortical visual impairment (CVI).
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CVI at home: finding my shoes

CVI at home: find my shoes
CVI at home: finding my shoes

For children with cortical visual impairment (CVI), we want to provide the opportunity to use vision throughout their day. We do this by use of the CVI Range (Roman) and incorporating an intentional approach, based on how the ten characteristics of CVI (Roman) impact each individual child. There are so many opportunities for this in the course of a child’s day, in the natural environment, right at home. Continue reading “CVI at home: finding my shoes”

Trick or treating with CVI

Trick or treating with CVI
Trick or treating with CVI

“Mommy, I can’t wear my glasses trick or treating because my mask goes over my face.” Until then it had not occurred to me that his head to toe Batman costume meant that friends would not likely recognize him at the first trick or treat in our new town.  The more strict school security meant no access to classrooms, no access to kids and parents at his new school. The hope was that Halloween would mean bumping into some new school friends, meeting families. Having a child with cortical visual impairment (CVI) who cannot recognize faces, makes it extra hard to recognize friends on Halloween. Continue reading “Trick or treating with CVI”

“Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage”

"Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage"
“Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage”

Children with cortical visual impairment (CVI) are inherently sensory kids. At least mine is, everywhere, all the time. Because of brain differences, sensory processing is different. In addition to vision, this means hearing, smells, taste, touch are different too. These differences are a part of nearly everything we do, every single day. And it is addressed in many ways. Continue reading ““Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage””