Everybody’s talking about salient features

Everybody's talking about salient features
Everybody’s talking about salient features

For children with cortical visual impairment (CVI), learning to visually identify salient features is a critical skill to making progress. These days we know that best practice is to incorporate salient features language earlier rather than later, while being mindful that our language does not compete with a child’s ability to use vision (Roman-Lantzy). Salient features are those two or three word descriptors that define an object, that are the essence of that object. Cupness. Treeness. That favorite hanging toyness. Mommyness. Continue reading “Everybody’s talking about salient features”

The AER Resolution, where’d it go?

The AER Resolution, where'd it go?
The AER Resolution, where’d it go?

You may remember last July, when we discussed a certain resolution that targeted students with cortical visual impairment (CVI), and the CVI Range (Roman-Lantzy). The Resolution was presented at the International AERBVI Conference in Reno, Nevada. Resolution (AER-2018-00) was presented on site  without prior notice, without warning, and hastily “passed” (absent members were denied the opportunity to vote). These are extreme tactics that are all too concerning in these political times. Continue reading “The AER Resolution, where’d it go?”

“Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage”

"Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage"
“Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage”

Children with cortical visual impairment (CVI) are inherently sensory kids. At least mine is, everywhere, all the time. Because of brain differences, sensory processing is different. In addition to vision, this means hearing, smells, taste, touch are different too. These differences are a part of nearly everything we do, every single day. And it is addressed in many ways. Continue reading ““Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage””

Novelty is a Great Big Deal (moving with your child who has CVI)

IMG_5811Moving is hard. Yesterday was about learning what a Great Big Deal the CVI characteristic of novelty still is for my son who has cortical visual impairment (CVI). After driving across the country, itself an exercise in novelty, among many other things, our belongings arrived in a small portion of a  vast shipping container. Prior to its arrival, we talked about having our “stuff” again. For several days, we occupied our new home with limited possessions and no furniture. It was the perfect low complexity environment for a child in Phase III CVI to learn about and explore a new living space. Continue reading “Novelty is a Great Big Deal (moving with your child who has CVI)”

What do you see? How do you know?

When it comes to looking at books with my son who has cortical visual impairment (CVI), there is a specific approach. He is in Phase III CVI (Roman-Lantzy) and there are some books that we buy off the shelf, and look at unmodified. As always,  when it comes to choosing books, the goal is to feed his interest in literacy by choosing subjects that will be meaningful and motivating. Recently we picked up This is How We Do It: One Day in the Lives of Seven Kids from Around the World, by Matt Lamothe. My son is incredibly social and highly interested in people and other kids, my suspicion was that he would like the book. Since buying it several weeks ago, Jasper has read it every night at bedtime. When he reads the book to me in the dim evening light, I can tell that he has the book memorized. Continue reading “What do you see? How do you know?”