CVI Holiday gift list (sorry, no pom poms)

It’s not too late for the Start Seeing CVI holiday gift list. You won’t find red pom poms here because children with cortical visual impairment (CVI) like more than just pom poms (and besides, you already know where to buy pom poms and bright flashy toys). What follows are gift ideas from busy CVI moms (especially at this time of the year). Many thanks for the great suggestions. Continue reading “CVI Holiday gift list (sorry, no pom poms)”

CVI modifications, it’s the little things.

CVI modifications, it's the little things
CVI modifications, it’s the little things

On the brink of November, for a child with cortical visual impairment (CVI), it is still the beginning of the school year. Each school year is different for all kids, but for kids with CVI, each year may as well be a whole new school (especially when it really is a new school, new school district, new neighborhood, new city, new state, a whole new world). The CVI characteristic of novelty (Roman-Lantzy) has an impact on our kids and “new” lasts longer. Newness lingers for them, much longer than it ever would for us. Continue reading “CVI modifications, it’s the little things.”

Everybody’s talking about salient features

Everybody's talking about salient features
Everybody’s talking about salient features

For children with cortical visual impairment (CVI), learning to visually identify salient features is a critical skill to making progress. These days we know that best practice is to incorporate salient features language earlier rather than later, while being mindful that our language does not compete with a child’s ability to use vision (Roman-Lantzy). Salient features are those two or three word descriptors that define an object, that are the essence of that object. Cupness. Treeness. That favorite hanging toyness. Mommyness. Continue reading “Everybody’s talking about salient features”

The AER Resolution, where’d it go?

The AER Resolution, where'd it go?
The AER Resolution, where’d it go?

You may remember last July, when we discussed a certain resolution that targeted students with cortical visual impairment (CVI), and the CVI Range (Roman-Lantzy). The Resolution was presented at the International AERBVI Conference in Reno, Nevada. Resolution (AER-2018-00) was presented on site ¬†without prior notice, without warning, and hastily “passed” (absent members were denied the opportunity to vote). These are extreme tactics that are all too concerning in these political times. Continue reading “The AER Resolution, where’d it go?”

“Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage”

"Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage"
“Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage”

Children with cortical visual impairment (CVI) are inherently sensory kids. At least mine is, everywhere, all the time. Because of brain differences, sensory processing is different. In addition to vision, this means hearing, smells, taste, touch are different too. These differences are a part of nearly everything we do, every single day. And it is addressed in many ways. Continue reading ““Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage””